Magic City By Trick Daddy

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Magic City By Trick Daddy
?A thug is someone who stands on his own. He lives by the decisions he makes and accepts the consequences. A thug is comfortable in his own skin. I wear mine like a glove.?  Trick Daddy was born a thug?just a stone?s throw from downtown Miami, yet a world away from its dazzling beauty and sparkling wealth. Where grinding poverty, deadly crime, and devastating racial tension taught kids to live by the ?hood rules. RemarkabLy, Trick came from nothing and made it big just when his chances had run out. Magic City is the extraordinary tale of a boy whose father was a pimp, who learned to hustle to survive, and whose only role model was his brother, the drug dealer he watched plying his trade on the block. It?s the untold truth behind the cult movie Scarface, of the drug money that transformed the city into a shining mecca for the rich and famous while turf wars between smalltime pushers claimed countless lives. It?s also the incredible story of how that potent mixt…

Remember Me By Mary Higgins Clark

Remember Me By Mary Higgins Clark
Remember Me By Mary Higgins Clark

Unable to forgive herself for the death of her two-year-old son Bobby in a car accident, Menley Nichols' marriage to Adam starts to fall apart- until the birth of their daughter Hannah. Determined to rebuild a life together around their precious baby, Menle

Y and Adam decide to rent a house on Cape Cod for a month, confidant that the tranquility of the place will be ideal for Menley and little Hannah. But the peace they crave is disturbed when strange things start to happen- incidents which make Menley relive the horror of the accident in which she lost Bobby. . . incidents which make her fear for Hannah. And step by step, Menley and Adam are drawn into a dark and sinister web of events whcih threatens their marriage, their child and ultimately Menley's sanity.


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